Although they are closely interconnected, Gdańsk, Gdynia, and Sopot each have a different character. Gdańsk is the business and cultural capital of the Pomorze region, imbued with a history spanning a thousand years. The Old Town boasts splendid manor houses, Gothic churches, the Neptune Fountain and the Artus Court (Dwór Artusa), which used to be the seat of the guild of merchants at the time when Gdańsk belonged to the Hanseatic League. The trademark of the city is the Medieval port crane called the Żuraw, which was used for loading and unloading goods.

Sopot is a luxury seaside resort town, a venue for mass events and a trendy shopping area. Its most recognizable symbol is its pier. Jutting out 560 yards into the sea, it is the longest wooden pier in Europe. At its end, the concentration of iodine is twice the amount recorded on the shoreline, which means that walks along the pier are good for your health. More than a hundred vessels can be moored along the pier at any given time. Plac Zdrojowy, the town’s central square, is the extension of the pier on land. The light-house towering over the square offers a panoramic view of the area, while the nearby outdoor concert hall is alive with music all summer. In winter, the square becomes an ice-skating rink.

Gdynia is a distinctive, special place. Constructed in the 1920s, it was the background of a freshly built modern harbor. To this day, the harbor area with its long promenade is the most characteristic part of the city. It is here that the historical ships are docked: the ORP Błyskawica, a 1930s destroyer, which is the oldest preserved ship of this class in the world, and the famous sailing frigate Dar Pomorza. The Naval Museum proudly shows the history of the Polish navy, while the Gdynia Aquarium allows you to discover fascinating secrets of underwater life.

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